Disaster recovery and high availability Part 2 – What you can do

You’ve thought long and hard about all of the things that could go wrong. It can get pretty depressing. The good part is that you can now get on with figuring out how to make things better. And, there is a lot you can do.

There are three areas that are at the heart of every comprehensive technology infrastructure recovery and resiliency plan. They are Backup, On site redundancy and an Off site mirror.

 

There are three areas that are at the heart of every comprehensive technology infrastructure recovery and resiliency plan. They are Backup, On site redundancy and an Off site mirror site.

Backup The first thing to look at is backup. It’s not the perfect solution in many scenarios, but when done right, it’s useful in a very wide variety of scenarios, including situations you might not have thought of. The best backup systems will have three characteristics. There will be an on-site component that’s easily accessible for fast restores. There will be an off-site component for protection against disasters that hit your site. And the backup will be segregated from your data storage so a virus or other malware can’t corrupt it.

On site redundancy Redundancy can take different forms. If you are worried about a power outage, perhaps you could have a generator at your site. If the issue is your internet connection, a different connection from a different provider is worth considering – preferably one that comes into your building from a different direction than your primary connection. Or you could consider one wired connection and one wireless connection. For servers and data storage, consider mirrored systems.

Off site mirror site This is often referred to as a disaster recovery site. You (or your service provider) sets up a data center that mirrors the capacity of your primary data center, with sufficient bandwidth that your staff will be able to work the (mostly) the same way as they would under normal circumstances. Should your site become unusable for some reason, people can be moved to a different site and use the backup data center. Or they can work from their homes or other, dispersed sites.

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